TRUST MAGIC PDF

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The software chain of trust starts with a chain of loaders. begin with a special header containing a magic number, CPU information, file type Using my PDF register table parsing tool I generated a RBWAC policy that. Have a good look trust magic for the best intro to trusts. When running Trust Magic is your best bet. Trust magic failed on the pdf download. bernasungueta.tk a copy of the Trust Magic by Dale Gatherum-Goss if anyone has one, none.


Trust Magic Pdf

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Hopefully this post is OK to post, if not please delete. I have the Trust Magic book by Dale Gatherum-Goss 6th edition together with the wealth. shoot me an email and will send through to you as a pdf not exorbitant. free!! Trust Magic by dale gatherum goss still the best. DT Property. A Treatise on White Magic. Sub-sections: RULES FOR MAGIC · INTRODUCTORY REMARKS · MAN'S THREE ASPECTS - Part 1 · MAN'S THREE ASPECTS.

Bibliography Aussie Firebug: April 21, , Sydney, Oz. All sounds perfectly legit, until you realise the accountants fees will eat into a lot of the benefits: Which is about how much you'd pay in increased accountants fees and ASIC fees for having the structure in place.

Of course, if you can stream income to people who currently have none then thats where the real benefits can be realised. Above is a very simple analysis. May or may not be applicable to you. Curious to know why you think you need it for 'asset protection'.

Who is going to sue you and for what? Adram 5 O'Clock Shadow Posts: Discretionary trusts are great structures for all the reasons you stated.

I use one myself. As Marty said, the accounting can be costly but doesn't have to be, and can be done yourself if you want to put the time into learning a bit. Corporate trustee is best for asset protection, can both be directors and equal shareholders so if one of you gets sued, total control of trustee cannot be gained by another party.

Beneficiaries - Most trust deeds are written to include all relatives and associated entities of the named beneficiaries as beneficiaries, even if they don't exist yet.

Bucket companies - they sound good but are a massive hassle unless you are very disciplined. Div7A catches a lot of people out. The income streamed to the company does not actually have to be paid to the company, can stay in the trust.

Lots of arguments about whether this creates a separate trust or not. Also extra cost for ASIC, company setup, tax preparation. As Marty says the tax savings generally don't make a huge difference with a low amount in there but it's always good to begin as you want to continue I think. Also if a spouse drops to low income due to taking time out for children can save a lot of tax. The asset protection is the main thing for me though. Thanks for the detailed replies! It's about getting the structure right now so we aren't taking a massive CGT hit when trying to get it in place later.

You are right on the other bit though, we don't really need 'asset protection'.

The main reason for the trust is so the income can be efficiently streamed between ourselves if one us suddenly stops working, etc. If not a corporate trustee then who would you make the trustee?

How hard is it going to be to change the trustee if required down the track? Tylor and developed in a more comprehensive way by James G. Frazer in The Golden Bough [] Frazer believed that magic, religion, and science constituted three Barbara A. According to Frazer, people have evolved from the stage of magical thinking, based on a belief in human creative powers, to religious thinking, characterized by a belief in human powerlessness and dependence on supernatural powers operating regardless of human wishes, to scientific thinking, which restored some of the former sense of human creative power.

However, this was not the magical power that allowed people to manipulate nature but power that stemmed from learning about nature and trying to understand the existing natural laws. T he second school of thought, functionalism, was founded by Bronislaw Malinowski [] ; Malinowski advocated a holistic approach to the study of cultures, sug- gesting that society should be analyzed as a whole with the objective of understanding how all the existing cultural elements were interrelated.

He was very much interested in individual biological needs and in the ways social institutions responded to these needs. He studied psychological and social functions of magic, religion, and science and emphasized individual experience as the source of their origin. He believed that both magic and religion grew out of emotional stress and functioned as escapes from diffi- cult emotional situations that offered no solutions by other scientific means.

Malinowski considered both magic and religion as a part of the human Zygon condition and as beliefs that are pragmatic devices necessary for the exist- ence of civilizations.

T herefore, in actual human experience, the distinc- tion between magic and religion is difficult to make.

T hus magic and religion are neither competitors nor alternatives, and we cannot interpret religion as a substitute for magic. If we blend these two trends of thought in anthropology, we see magic, religion, and science simultaneously operating in human societies, con- tinuously interacting with each other and other elements of culture Malinowski , and at the same time undergoing changes Frazer. Today this perspective can be expanded by inclusion of technology, defined as any tools used by humans in their interactions with their natural and social environment at any stage of human evolution, and by addition of ethics, understood as a system of norms and guidelines directing, shaping, and interpreting human behavior Strassberg , T he hegemony of both technology and ethics in the postmodern social scientific discourse, which includes the religion-and-science dialogue, is beyond dispute.

It is hard to envision a culture today that would abandon any of these five elements. Obviously they evolve all the time together with the chang- ing human biological, social, and cultural needs. Some needs expire, oth- ers are modified, and new ones continuously develop.

T herefore, some of the old functions of cultural elements are no longer performed, others are modified, and new ones are added. T he general character of each society and culture decides which needs dominate and which functions disappear or suddenly change into dysfunctions. In order to expand the above interpretations, we look at the relationship between magic, religion, science, technology, and ethics in the context of the postmodern world and try to better understand this relationship by applying elements of postmodern social scientific theories to their inter- pretation.

Out of numerous key issues being discussed today, I select trust as a concept that allows me to clearly illustrate the oneness of magic, reli- gion, science, technology, and ethics in everyday human experience.

Barbara A. Strassberg T he thirteen fundamental characteristics of postmodernity are processuality becoming ; continuity paradoxes ; systemicity interrelated events ; reflex- ivity feedback ; plurality; complexity; contingency; decentrality center is ev- erywhere ; wholeness; agency; supraindividuality community ; ethics moral competence ; and politics allocation of public attention Strassberg Postmodernity is urban and middle class in its character, dominated by media, open to fundamentalism, and allows for the juxtaposition of dis- courses and mixing of diverse images Ahmed , 10— Among these characteristics, wholeness, the growing recognition of the interconnections between everything that is, can help us interpret magic, religion, science, technology, and ethics as different aspects of the same human experience.

Bauman and the Postmodern Unsicherheit. He agrees with Anthony Giddens that most of the time we live in a state of ontological secu- rity, with a sense of the reliability of persons and things and the apparent predictability of our daily routines.

Other books: DARK LOVER EPUB

To worry about eternity does not come naturally, and a great effort is needed for the worry to outweigh the daily concerns and tasks. To show the process of deconstructing ultimate concerns and transform- ing them into daily problems that need to be taken care of Bauman uses the example of death.

One cannot do much with that prospect as such, and it would be utterly foolish to concern oneself with things one can do nothing about. According to Bauman, the highest level of uncertainty is evoked by a particular danger: that of missing an opportunity by not seeing clearly enough which of the existing options to choose at the time of making a decision.

And, in order to be sufficient, these resources have to comprise a number of cultural elements:. We are somewhat less horrified today by the nasty habit things have of spilling over their definitional boundaries, or even by the premonition that the drawing of such boundaries with any degree of lasting reliability defies human resources.

T he price in question is the agony of the individual condemned to self-sufficiency, self-reliance and a life of never fully satisfying and trustworthy choice. If we look at the development of fundamen- talism from a global perspective, however, we see that it is only one among many forms of religion functioning in the world today as one among many resources that people can use to cope with existential anxiety.

T he evolu- tion of human societies reflects a transition from societies of fate to soci- eties of human agency, and more and more people become interdependent, rely on cooperation, and use technology that makes life even less predict- able. People have many more options to choose from and live surrounded by anonymity and the impersonality of strangers.

In a world characterized by these features there is no other means to secure survival but trust Sztompka , 11 — 14 that fits our postmodern reality characterized by the recognition of the importance of human agency. Strassberg Sztompka and the Sociological Theory of Trust. In this account trust consists of two main components: beliefs and commitment.

First, it involves specific expectations. We must also face the future actively, by committing ourselves to action with at least partly uncertain and uncontrollable consequences. Sztompka emphasizes that there are three dimensions of trust pp.

A relational dimension. Trust is a relationship in which the truster lacks sufficient information concerning all relevant aspects of the situa- tion, and it is both a precondition for cooperation and a product of suc- cessful cooperation.

Trust performs a number of functions. For individual partners of the interaction, endowing each other with trust evokes positive actions. T hus, trust liberates and mobilizes human agency and increases possibilities for action.

For the wider community, trust encourages socia- bility, helps communication, encourages acceptance of and respect for strangers, strengthens the bond between individuals and community, and increases the chances for cooperation.

A psychological dimension. Trust is a personality trait, a trusting im- pulse, which is a product of the process of socialization in the intimate, caring climate of families.

Book: Trust Magic - Dale Gatherum-Goss

In order to survive in the postmodern world of uncertainty, people often turn to magic, religion, science, technology, and ethics as trust providers. Magical thinking helps us maintain trust in our- selves even when we realize that the commonly spread belief that we can be whatever we want to be or do whatever we want to do is to a large extent unfounded. Science allows us to trust the experiments that repeat- edly give the same results and theories that continuously change in the light of changing empirical data.

We trust that scientists fully understand the processuality of scientific truths and the dependence of their data on the instruments of measurement that they use at any given time. A cultural dimension. Trust is a cultural rule, a product of history, which allows for the development of cultures of trust or cultures of dis- trust. A culture of trust can be illustrated by our trust in technology, espe- cially in abstract expert systems Giddens When we trust these technological systems, in fact we trust the persons who design, construct, Zygon and operate them.

We trust that they are ethical people and that we can bet that their past and future actions give them the necessary expertise. Experts who make the abstract systems operate are bound by the codes of their professional ethics to acquire the necessary level of expertise to secure the trust of the coworkers within a given system and of people who use the system to satisfy their needs.

People who are at the access points of abstract systems remind us that there are individuals involved in the operation of these systems a smiling flight attendant before we board the plane and that we can trust them even though we do not see them. We trust not only people we have never met but also the practices and social mechanisms about which our own technological knowledge is slight or nonexistent.

We do that because a most of us were socialized into an aura of respect for technical knowledge of all kinds, in spite of the poten- tial fallibility of all claims to knowledge in science , 89 , and b this respect is based on skepticism and reserve; at any time the decision can be made to learn all the details about the abstract system and its operations. T he empirical potentiality opening the system for scrutiny makes trust seem more justified and the ignorance about its operations a matter of choice rather than the result of a lack of necessary intellectual potential or of the fact that the system itself is untestable.

Because trust in abstract systems means trust in the ethical conduct of those on whose actions those systems depend, we also need to address the postmodern ethic. In my interpretation, ethics is both genetically and functionally interconnected with magic, religion, science, and technology, and they are all outcomes of the same evolutionary processes.

Bauman , 4 Moral responsibility is the most personal and inalienable of human possessions, and the most precious of human rights. It cannot be taken away, shared, ceded, pawned, or deposited for safe keeping.

Moral responsibility is unconditional and infinite, and it manifests itself in the constant anguish of not manifesting itself enough. Moral responsibility does not look for reassurance for its right to be or for excuses for its right not to be. It is there before any reassurances or proof and after any excuse or absolution. T his means that individuals need to operate as moral selves who draw norms from a variety of sources and follow them guided by internalized means of social control.

In everyday life, such moral selves interact with technology all the time. Technology keeps dividing, splitting, fragmenting, and atomizing all aspects of social life and culture as well as of human beings. But the reap- propriation of expert knowledge by re-skilling is not enough, and the solution to our postmodern problems often requires that we rely simulta- neously on the ethics of the experts operating technological systems, on science and its theories, experiments, and measuring instruments, on sta- tistics, reflexivity, religion, and even magic.

Now I want to focus on the changes that they all undergo under the influence of each other and of numerous social and cultural factors that coevolve with them throughout the history of humanity. T he process of evolution toward democratization is both spontaneous and intended, because it occurs as a result of the continuous unfolding of human potential, which is additionally stimulated and accelerated by edu- cation.

In my interpretation, ethics is both genetically and functionally interconnected with magic, religion, science, and technology, and they are all outcomes of the same evolutionary processes.

Bauman , 4 Moral responsibility is the most personal and inalienable of human possessions, and the most precious of human rights. It cannot be taken away, shared, ceded, pawned, or deposited for safe keeping. Moral responsibility is unconditional and infinite, and it manifests itself in the constant anguish of not manifesting itself enough.

Moral responsibility does not look for reassurance for its right to be or for excuses for its right not to be. It is there before any reassurances or proof and after any excuse or absolution.

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T his means that individuals need to operate as moral selves who draw norms from a variety of sources and follow them guided by internalized means of social control. In everyday life, such moral selves interact with technology all the time. Technology keeps dividing, splitting, fragmenting, and atomizing all aspects of social life and culture as well as of human beings. But the reap- propriation of expert knowledge by re-skilling is not enough, and the solution to our postmodern problems often requires that we rely simulta- neously on the ethics of the experts operating technological systems, on science and its theories, experiments, and measuring instruments, on sta- tistics, reflexivity, religion, and even magic.

Now I want to focus on the changes that they all undergo under the influence of each other and of numerous social and cultural factors that coevolve with them throughout the history of humanity. T he process of evolution toward democratization is both spontaneous and intended, because it occurs as a result of the continuous unfolding of human potential, which is additionally stimulated and accelerated by edu- cation. T hat is the fundamental principle of democracy.

Magic of Security

On a macro scale, the timeline illustrating the evolution of magic, reli- gion, science, technology, and ethics would look like a spiral of cyclically recurring stages characterized by different levels of dispersion of human Do-It-Yourself competency in regard to magic, religion, science, technol- ogy and ethics.

In the postmodern reality, the democratization of magical thinking is reflected in a widespread belief in lucky numbers, lucky charms, or touch- ing wood for protection, in horoscopes or fortune telling, or in paranor- mal and occult phenomena McGuire , — T he democratization of religion is often called privatization, and it manifests itself in a personal relationship between individuals and the sacred.

T he democratization of science can be seen in the growing interest of the general population, espe- cially in the post-industrial countries, in becoming informed consumers. Technology becomes democratized rather quickly as well.

Individuals in all corners of the world are carrying cell phones and using other devices of electronic communication. Ethics also becomes democratized in the postmodern world. One may legislate universal rule-dictated duties, but moral re- Barbara A.

Strassberg sponsibility exists solely in interpellating the individual and being carried individually. T hese evolutionary stages do not occur in magic, religion, science, tech- nology, and ethics at the same time or with the same speed. We may encounter a simultaneous operation of individual and group experts at different stages of the democratization of magical, religious, scientific, tech- nological, and ethical practices.

As we understand today, the punctuated- equilibrium model illustrates evolutionary changes in a more accurate way than a straight upward-sloping line does. It becomes obvious that any model suggesting a simple from-to process of transformation of cultural elements by substitution of one by another does not reflect reality at the level of human everyday expe- rience.

In our times there is a continuous fluctuation between the stages of individual experts, categories of experts, and secondary postmodern democracy. It occurs with every new technological gadget introduced to the market, ev- ery new scientific discovery or invention, every new interpretation of reli- gion, and every new realization of human irrationality and predisposition toward superstitions as well as with every new mini ethical code generated by new ethical needs of the postmodern society and culture.

T his fluctua- tion is a result of the operation of many factors. I select three to illustrate my point. On a macro level, it also presents itself in a variety of forms.

At first the resistance takes place within a specific system. It is much harder for fol- lowers of a given religious system to accept a new interpretation of their sacred texts than it is for people affiliated with other systems, and it is much harder for scientists working in a given scientific discipline to accept a new discovery or invention than it is for people who represent different disciplines or for nonscientists.

Once the acceptance of the novelty is negotiated within the original system, the resistance may be continued by other systems. For instance, David C. Lindberg , analyzing the responses to the discoveries made by Copernicus and Galileo, argues that the initial negative response came from the scientific community rather than from the Roman Catholic Zygon Church.

T he resistance of the church came later and was not at all unani- mous. What has often been interpreted in terms of a conflict between religious and scientific interpretations of reality actually originated as a conflict between conservative and progressive forces within science.

In a similar way, the history of Christianity in the United States illustrates the process by which new interpretations of sacred texts lead to numerous in- ternal splits within particular churches. T he tensions between conserva- tive and progressive forces within religious systems that result in the development of thousands of different interpretations of the Bible seem to be the cause of most of the resistance to change within a particular reli- gious system.

Because of resistance to change, almost every new element introduced to religion, science, technology, or ethics by producers of culture is initially surrounded by narratives reporting the ways in which this element is going to harm individuals, societies, cultures, or all of humanity Schultz Such a past is frequently constructed and portrayed as an ideal that has suddenly been threatened or even lost. T he shortcomings of that past that fueled the spontaneous evolution of society and culture out of the past and into the present are hardly ever acknowl- edged.

In the realm of religion, the resurgence of fundamentalism in its postmodern version is a good example, and in the realm of technology, whether the object in question was the steam engine, bicycle, car, T V set, computer, video game, or all-in-one cell phone, the first response has usu- ally been expressed in the form of a horror story about the negative effects such an invention would have on individuals, communities, and the entire fabric of society.

In spite of the resistance, however, the new cultural ele- ments become accepted first by the experts and then by the general popu- lation. Over time, the scope of acceptance spreads, the democratization of the implementation of these elements takes place, and they are incorpo- rated into the already existing web of relationships. T he second important issue has to do with boundaries.

If we agree that magic, religion, science, technology, and ethics are components of a tapestry of culture, we can talk about them as separate systems only if we apply the essentialist perspective to the analysis of human experience in- stead of trying to acknowledge the hybridal and fluid character of that experience. Knowledge is knowledge, be it scientific, religious, or any other. Strassberg magic but in all societies throughout the whole history of humanity.

Take the recent example of a father of a year-old American soldier who was killed in Iraq T homas When the father received the news about the death of his son he poured gasoline on himself and the military van in which the marines who brought him the news arrived, and set him- self and the van on fire. We can view such an act as the outcome of magi- cal, religious, scientific, technological, and ethical impulse. T here have been numerous examples in history of people who believed that their own death by burning could bring a dramatic change even in the course of macro events.

T hey believed that they had the power to change reality by their own actions magic , that supernatural forces would take mercy see- ing their despair and take their life in exchange for the life of the loved one religion ; they knew that fire brings a finite end science and that the use of additional tools, such as gasoline, accelerates the process and almost guarantees the success of the endeavor technology.

Philip Hefner also sees the oneness of technology, society, nature, and cosmos. He pushes this oneness even further, finding a religious meaning in technology. In his interpretation this meaning is similar to the one that unfolds itself in the macro process of the becoming of cosmos, life, human beings, and everything that is. He proposes seeing technology as a sacred space, a medium of divine action, a major place where religion happens, Zygon and a place where we wrestle with the God who comes to engage us , T hird, we need to address our role as agents in evolution, as creators of societies and cultures.

A close look at what we create reveals that our creativity is very limited and reflects the patterns of creativity embedded in nature. Nature is characterized by the development of very few forms, and the processes of evolution seem to be restricted to a replication of these fundamental forms in numerous new configurations rather than a devel- opment of new forms. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi observed that it is easier for us to imagine a life among better appliances than among better people.

T hat is, we have more lethal weapons but kill for the same reasons, and we have better medical technology but crave eternity the same way we did when we were invent- ing abstract concepts of eternal afterlife.

If we look at our technology, we realize that it only serves as an extension or enhancement of our innate natural potential, and thus our oneness with nature is reemphasized. If we look at social life and cultural beliefs, we see that our imagination is equally restricted. T he science fiction pro- duced today offers us some imaginary reality of the most advanced tech- nology from the distant future— which still serves only as means of transportation and communication and of destruction or protection of what exists.

And it portrays the same social hierarchies, relationships, de- sires, and patterns of behavior as the ones we have observed so far through- out our history, as if it is impossible for us to create an actually new social order or cultural arrangements. Processes of multidimensional globalization, the consequences of which are becoming more and more evident all over the world, and the develop- ment of information technology and of the net of communication, con- tribute to the growing inclusion of diverse social and cultural components into one global space of the universe itself.

T he universe seems to be devel- oping, through human beings, the tools that are necessary for its own pro- cess of becoming. We do whatever we can to make sure we will live and reproduce the species.

And our survival seems, at least now, to be neces- sary for the universe, since so far only we are capable of playing the role of created co-creators Hefner who can intentionally shape the pro- cesses of evolution. T his intentionality, combined with the desire to understand our experi- ences, motivates us to study all of the dimensions of the universe to the extent we can with the instruments we have at any given time. T his allows us to create conceptual narratives— philosophical, theological, sociologi- Barbara A.

Strassberg cal, scientific, and so forth—and inject them into the tapestry of culture, and thus the interpretations and meanings that we create enter the uni- verse and make its own self-reflexivity possible.

Such reflexivity is a tool necessary for the universe—as a self-regulating system—to continually re- assemble itself in order to absorb everything we create. In a similar way we use self-reflexivity when we reassemble fragments of our daily lives into a process of our individual becoming Bauman , T he postmodern interpretation of reality allows con- tradictions to coexist, boundaries to be fluid, and the increasing Unsicherheit to be simultaneously counterbalanced by our trust in magic, religion, sci- ence, and technology—that is, in God and human beings.

Whether or not we trust God depends on our untestable faith; whether or not we trust human beings and can be trusted ourselves depends on our testable beliefs. Trust takes us to the realm of postmodern ethics, which demands from us responsibility for our choices and accountability for all of the consequences of our actions, including the unintended but predictable ones.Caiazza, John.

T homas, Ken. Mike A , 7th Oct, Moral responsibility does not look for reassurance for its right to be or for excuses for its right not to be. Another alternative is to loan the money back to the trust using a Division 7A loan. This means we need to get the correct structures in place. T hey undergo changes under the influence of each other and of social and cultural factors that coevolve with them throughout the history of humanity in the direction of democratization.

A close look at what we create reveals that our creativity is very limited and reflects the patterns of creativity embedded in nature.

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